Plotting History: Steven Haby: How I use the PMI Victorian History Library collection

Plotting History: Steven Haby: How I use the PMI Victorian History Library collection

bus

As readers may not be aware your Secretary Librarian is a keen student on bus, railway, shipping and tramway history and I’ve been a regular contributor to a number of journals. In preparing an article on, for example, bus services in Box Hill during the 1950s to 1970s I would often refer to the collection. I’d use it to source information regarding the development of the suburb that supported or influenced the growth of bus services in the area. Sources include established histories of Box Hill and surrounding suburbs and articles published in historical society journals

We also have a vertical file of ephemeral material such as brochures, maps or guides that, for example, would be too small to easily house within the collection. This collection provides another source of invaluable information about a specific area that may not have been included in a book or article. Images are also very important in helping create an impression of what a suburb or town would have been like during a particular time. The PMI Victorian History Library is developing a small but significant collection of images gathered from various sources. For example, the image above is taken from the Bus & Coach Society of Victoria’s CD collection of Victorian bus body builders from the 1920s to the 1980s. Here we see a GFM-071 a Ford with A. E. Grummet & Son bodywork from the early 1950s at Wattle Park. The bus belonged to F. H. Rennie & Son which operated a tram feeder service from Burwood tram to Box Hill station via Wattle Park tram. Note the wonderful detail of the shopping centre in the background including signage for the State Savings Bank of Victoria and Street’s Ice Cream, and the arrangement of the tramway wiring including the green lighting housing powered from the tram wires. Furthermore apart from the bus there is only one other car in the picture.

These sorts of street scenes provide much needed and rich sources of information to the historian when writing about a locality.

To avoid the misappropriation that local histories can appear to be dry and uninteresting, the use of ephemeral material and images where possible will dramatically improve the appeal of the definitive history of whatever town/area is being written about.

Steven Haby

Secretary Librarian

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